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Hosoda Takes 10000 m Bronze - Taipei Universiade Athletics Day One Japanese Results



Ai Hosoda became the first Japanese medalist of the Taipei 2017 Summer Universiade, winning bronze in the women's 10000 m to wrap the first day of athletics competition.


Leading the field with a sub-32 best, 19-year-old Yuki Munehisa led the first 9000 m on the race before being overtaken by Daria Maslova (Kyrgyszstan),  Sanjivani Jadhav (India) and Hosoda. On the last lap Maslova kicked away to gold in 33:19.27 less than 3 seconds ahead of Jadhav, with Hosoda 6 seconds behind for bronze. Munehisa fell to 4th, with third team member Natsuki Sekiya, a favorite to medal in the 5000 m, off her game at 12th in 35:21.19.


With the rest of the day devoted to qualifying rounds Hosoda's medal was the day's only take for Japan. London World Championships men's 4x100 m bronze medalist Shuhei Tada easily made it through to the semifinals, winning both his heat and quarterfinal and running the fastest quarterfinal time of the day with a 10.29 (0.0 m/s). Teammate Yusuke Tanaka made it to the quarterfinals but did not advance to the semis. Likewise for the two women in the 100 m, Miyu Maeyama and Ichiko Iki. In the men's 400 m, London team member Takamasa Kitagawa was eliminated in the heats, his 47.85 the fastest time not to make the semifinals.


In jumps and throws every Japanese athlete made it through the qualifying rounds. Triple jumper Ryoma Yamamoto was the only man to clear the 16.50 autoqualifying mark, his jump of 16.65 m ranking him 1st going into the final. Haruka Kitaguchi led her qualifying group in the women's javelin throw with a throw of 57.96 m, ranking her 3rd behind the top two from the other group. Marina Saito was 3rd in that group with a throw of 57.24 m to join Kitaguchi in the final. Kunihiro Sumi also advanced in the men's hammer throw, marking 60.21 m.

Taipei 2017 Summer Universiade Day One Japanese Results

Taipei, Taiwan, 8/23/17
click here for complete results

Women's 10000 m Final
1. Daria Maslova (Kyrgyszstan) - 33:19.27
2. Sanjivani Jadhav (India) - 33:22.00
3. Ai Hosoda (Japan) - 33:27.89
-----
4. Yuki Munehisa (Japan) - 33:40.45
12. Natsuki Sekiya (Japan) - 35:21.19

Men's 100 m Heat One (+0.1 m/s)
1. Cameron Burrell (U.S.A.) - 10.43 - Q
2. Yusuke Tanaka (Japan) - 10.51 - Q
3. Dominik Zalesky (Czech Republic) - 10.63 - Q

Men's 100 m Heat Four (-1.3 m/s)
1. Shuhei Tada (Japan) - 10.33 - Q
2. Heber Gallegos Moreno (Mexico) - 10.41 - Q
3. Luca Cassano (Italy) - 10.60 - Q

Men's 100 m Quarterfinal Two (-0.4 m/s)
1. Jan Volko (Slovakia) - 10.31 - Q
2. Tyquendo Tracey (Jamaica) - 10.32 - Q
3. Le Shon Collins (U.S.A.) - 10.43 - Q
-----
4. Yusuke Tanaka (Japan) - 10.60

Men's 100 m Quarterfinal Three (0.0 m/s)
1. Shuhei Tada (Japan) - 10.29 - Q
2. Chun-Han Yang (Taiwan) - 10.31 - Q
3. Cameron Burrell (U.S.A.) - 10.42 - Q

Women's 100 m Heat One (-0.8 m/s)
1. Shashalee Forbes (Jamaica) - 11.41 - Q
2. Viola Kleiser (Austria) - 11.82 - Q
3. Iza Flores Hernandez (Mexico) - 11.93 - Q
-----
4. Miyu Maeyama (Japan) - 12.01 - q

Women's 100 m Heat Three (-0.4 m/s)
1. Salome Kora Joseph (Swizterland) - 11.90 - Q
2. Jelisa Westney (Canada) - 11.94 - Q
3. Ichiko Iki (Japan) - 12.02 - Q

Women's 100 m Quarterfinal Two (-0.3 m/s)
1. Shashalee Forbes (Jamaica) - 11.39 - Q
2. Olga Safronova (Kazakhstan) - 11.62 - Q
3. Viola Kleiser (Austria) - 11.80 - Q
-----
6. Miyu Maeyama (Japan) - 11.93

Women's 100 m Quarterfinal Four (-0.3 m/s)
1. Irene Siragusa (Italy) - 11.33 - Q
2. Salome Kora Joseph (Switzerland) - 11.47 - Q
3. Corinne Humphreys (Great Britain) - 11.52 - Q
-----
6. Ichiko Iki (Japan) - 11.96

Men's 400 m Heat Three
1. Darren Alfred (Trinidad and Tobago) - 47.18 - Q
2. Daniele Angelella (Switzerland) - 47.34 - Q
3. Takamasa Kitagawa (Japan) - 47.85

Men's Triple Jump Qualification Group B
1. Ryoma Yamamoto (Japan) - 16.65 m - Q
2. Alberto Alvarez Munoz (Mexico) - 16.47 m - q
3. Nazim Babayev (Azerbaijan) - 16.32 m - q

Men's Hammer Throw Qualification Group A
1. Serghei Marghiev (Moldova) - 72.59 m - Q
2. Bence Halasz (Hungary) - 71.29 m - Q
3. Diego Del Real Galindo (Mexico) - 70.50 - Q
-----
8. Kunihiro Sumi (Japan) - 62.01 - Q

Women's Javelin Throw Qualification Group A
1. Christin Hussong (Germany) - 60.18 m - Q
2. Anete Kocina (Latvia) - 58.85 m - q
3. Marina Saito (Japan) - 57.24 m - q

Women's Javelin Throw Qualification Group B
1. Haruka Kitaguchi (Japan) - 57.96 m - q
2. Marcelina Witek (Poland) - 57.71 m - q
3. Liveta Jasiunaite (Lithuania) - 57.43 m - q

© 2017 Brett Larner, all rights reserved

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